Student Encyclopedia

Ta-ra-ra-Bumba, I sit on the pedestal I. So what is this song such intrusive, long settling in the brain? Many sources (eg, Baker's Student Encyclopedia of Music) does not seem to know the answer to the question and briefly reported that the Ta-Ra-Ra-Boom-De-Re – a meaningless ditty (with strong stakes in the Boom) of unknown authorship, the first Published in 1891, and in addition to his popularity as a basis for a variety of parodies. But if you dig, you can learn that song, Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay wrote for vaudeville Tuxedo (The Tuxedo"), Henry Sayers (Henry. J. Sayers). Later, however, he admits that he wrote a song, and wrote that he had heard in the 1880s, performed by the Negro singer Mama Lou (Mama Lou). Author's version of the text was so (the first verse with chorus): A smart and stylish girl you see, Belle of good society Not too strict but rather free Yet as right as right can be! Never forward, never bold Not too hot, and not too cold But the very thing, I'm told, That in your arms you'd like to hold.

Chorus: Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay! (Sung eight times) Premiere of "Tux" held in Boston in 1891. And in the same year the song with altered words and called Tha-ma-ra-boum-di-he was performed by a singer in Paris music-hall Polaire (emilie Marie Bouchaud). The first verse and chorus sounded like: J'suis une jeune fille de bonn 'famille a la frimouss' vive et gentille Qui r'cut un 'bonne education Au couvent d'la Visitation On m'app'lait la grand' dechiquetee Vu qu 'au lieu d'ecouter la lecon D'suivre attentivement la dictee J'disais a la pionn 'sans facon: Tha-ma-ra-boum-di-he (bis) Vot' bahut j'l'ai dans l'nez La grammair ' ca m'fait suer Tha-ma-ra-boum-di-he (bis) Chahuter, chahuter N'y a qu'ca pour bien s'porter year later, Sayers will offer its creation, editing and arranging the words of British singer and dancer Lottie Collins (Lottie Collins) (Charlotte Louisa Collins). And fall into the top ten: in 1892, Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay, followed by a performance of can-can be incorporated into an adapted version of the operetta, Edmond Audran (Edmond Audran) Miss Helyett and make a strong impression on his contemporaries. One journalist wrote: "She was turning, turning, grimacing, bend your plastic, masculine figure in the hundreds of wild poses. " And "Tararabumbia" swept Europe.

It was recorded on a gramophone, was performed on the stage, appearing very different remixes of national content. Such plates, apparently, and listened to Chekhov's characters, and for them it was the march, which went under the familiar, comfortable life. Well this is how we bid farewell to an epoch under the sounding of all the booths hit of summer 1999 "Killed a Negro." Song is still alive. On catchy tune laid marches, ballads and songs of scouting. Here is an example of its modern version: