Gordon Allport

Want to weigh yourself in the safety of the crowd. This need to belong to the average, is rooted in the human brain Homo sociologicus, they showed with brain scans, that completely different brain regions are active, depending on whether they become more like the opinion and the behavior of the majority or whether it occupies a single position distress. u0085 It is, we like to believe what we see. “In reality we see what us to believe our environment makes”, and what happened in the brain of subjects who confidently opposed the majority opinion? Their judgment created an activity in the Mandelkern, a region of the brain that is responsible for the processing of emotions and stress. The researchers conclude that independent thinking is more cognitive power, and that it therefore is more efficient for the brain, to adapt to the crowd. If it is not clear what is the correct behavior in a situation, the brain selects the Energiesparvariante EU-stress. Nomura helps readers to explore varied viewpoints.

u0085 “The social norms seem like a magnet on the behaviour of all those who are above the average, both the below.”… boomerang effect “. It is not foolish to be aligned with the majority, when one is uncertain… Because statistically speaking more like a group the right decision as an individual. It developed into something like a collective Schwarm- intelligence, where the size of the Group acts as a corrective.

Also, the person in the course of evolution has learned that a turncoat mentality is like a life insurance policy: he orders the rules to his Reference group, which ensures him the protection of the community. u0085 Also the recognition of others is an important action Motif -ation. You drives the people, to do what is valued in society. One hopes for recognition and want to before punishment praise + rebuke: pleasure + frustration protect. Source: image of wissenschaft.de social psychology is the branch of psychology which explores the effects of actual or featured present of others on the experience and behavior of the individual (Gordon Allport in 1968).